Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

Ed and Elaine Brown taken into custody.

October 6, 2007

October 4, 2007

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A couple convicted of tax evasion were arrested peacefully at their Plainfield home Thursday night after holing up at the fortress-like compound for months, the U.S. Marshals Service said.Ed and Elaine Brown were convicted on federal tax charges in January and refused to turn themselves in to authorities when they were sentenced in April to five years and three months in prison.It was not immediately clear how they were taken into custody.

We have just seen the news that Ed and Elaine Brown have been taken into custody by the US Marshalsd Service.

The mainstream media continue to portray the Brown’s as a dodgy couple who were trying all manner of things to avoid paying personal Federal Income Tax. In reality, if we understand the situation correctly, the Browns have been willing to settle any tax liability if they were shown the law and statute that requires them to file a personal Federal Income Tax return and pay any subsequent liability.

The New Hampshire Union Leader also runs an article describing the arrests but is mysteriously short on details when it comes to describing the manner of the operation used to effect the arrests. They do quote US Marshal Stephe Monier as saying:-

“We had no indication that the Browns intended to voluntarily surrender, so we had to move forward with an operation that promised the safest possible outcome. That day was today”

So once again, the question “Show me the law?” remains unanswered and two US citizens are temporarily silenced through the use of force.

Yet former IRS Special Agent Joe Banister was so concerned the law he was enforcing was both illegal and unconstitutional he spent two years of his own time investigating the legitmacy of the personal Federal Income Tax.

So once again the demand must not be repeated of the IRS. Show us the law?

Its all about the New World order stupid

October 3, 2007

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Less health care for the children maybe all the teeth in the childrens mouth will fall out and they will no longer be able to eat-get my point-the new world order.

Iraq is More Important then Health Insurance for Kids

I’m a little confused. Someone unconfuse me.

1 bill.  1 bill for health insurance. 1 bill to help millions of poor children get insurance. 1 bill that Bush just vetoed.

Fact: Bush has spent, or will spend $700 BILLION for a war in Iraq.  Bush feels spending $35 billion is too much money to insure 4 million poor children who are without healthcare right now.

Fact: Bush has given $50 BILLION in subsidies for huge oil companies but feels not enough americans deserve health insurance.

Are children the bottom feeders?  I’m a single mother, I only make 40K a year.  I’m told I make too much for state insurance, yet, my taxes go to pay for medicare for ADULTS who are capable of working so they can have health insurance.  My taxes.  I can’t afford the $700 a month premium at my work to insure my daughter.  I had to take a policy with a $2,500 deductible in order to afford any kind of insurance. 

I feel freaking duped by our government suddenly.  Can’t they for once just agree that our kids should come first. 

This saddens me. Seriously saddens me.  It’s no wonder we can’t get our priorities straight.

Here’s to all those poor children, sorry kids, no medicines for you today, hopefully you’ll survive another day.

Thank you President Bush, thank you.

http://leesaann1173.wordpress.com/

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Read story below: Bush vetoes child health insurance plan

Bush vetoes child health insurance plan Copyright © 2007 The Associated Press

October 3, 2007

Bush vetoes child health insurance plan

By JENNIFER LOVEN, Associated Press Writer 10 minutes ago October 3, 2007

President Bush, in a sharp confrontation with Congress, on Wednesday vetoed a bipartisan bill that would have dramatically expanded children’s health insurance.

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It was only the fourth veto of Bush’s presidency, and one that some Republicans feared could carry steep risks for their party in next year’s elections. The Senate approved the bill with enough votes to override the veto, but the margin in the House fell short of the required number.

Democrats unleashed a stream of harsh rhetoric, as they geared up for a battle to both improve their chances of winning a veto override and score political points against Republicans who oppose the expansion.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., decried Bush’s action as a “heartless veto.”

“Never has it been clearer how detached President Bush is from the priorities of the American people,” Reid said in a statement. “By vetoing a bipartisan bill to renew the successful Children’s Health Insurance Program, President Bush is denying health care to millions of low-income kids in America.”

Democratic congressional leaders said they may put off the override attempt for as long as two weeks to maximize pressure on Republican House members whose votes will be critical.

“We remain committed to making SCHIP into law — with or without the president’s support,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., referring to the full name of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.

The White House sought little attention for Bush’s action, with the president casting his veto behind closed doors without any fanfare or news coverage. He defended it later Wednesday during a budget speech in Lancaster, Pa., addressing a welcoming audience organized by the Lancaster Chamber of Commerce and Industry in GOP-friendly Pennsylvania Dutch country.

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“Poor kids first,” Bush said. “Secondly, I believe in private medicine, not the federal government running the health care system.”

But he seemed eager to avert a full-scale showdown over the difficult issue, offering that he is “more than willing” to negotiate with lawmakers “if they need a little more money in the bill to help us meet the objective of getting help for poor children.”

The program is a joint state-federal effort that subsidizes health coverage for 6.6 million people, mostly children, from families that earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to afford their own private coverage.

The Democrats who control Congress, with significant support from Republicans, passed the legislation to add $35 billion over five years to allow an additional 4 million children into the program. It would be funded by raising the federal cigarette tax by 61 cents to $1 per pack.

The president argued that the Democratic bill was too costly, took the program too far beyond its original intent of helping the poor, and would entice people now covered in the private sector to switch to government coverage. He has proposed only a $5 billion increase in funding. After Bush’s speech, White House counselor Ed Gillespie said the president’s offer of more money meant more than the $5 billion extra, but he wasn’t specific about how much more.

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Democrats deny Bush’s charge that their plan is a move toward socialized medicine that short-changes the poor, saying their goal is to cover more of the millions of uninsured children and noting that the bill provides financial incentives for states to cover their lowest-income children first. Of the over 43 million people nationwide who lack health insurance, over 6 million are under 18 years old. That’s over 9 percent of all children.

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Eighteen Republicans joined Democrats in the Senate, enough to override Bush’s veto. But in the House, supporters of the bill are about two dozen votes short of a successful override, despite sizable Republican support. A two-thirds majority in both chambers is needed.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said Democrats were imploring 15 House Republicans to switch positions but had received no agreements so far.

House Minority Whip Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said he was “absolutely confident” that the House would be able to sustain Bush’s expected veto.

Senate Minority Whip Trent Lott, R-Miss., said Congress should be able to reach a compromise with Bush once he vetoes the bill. “We should not allow it to be expanded to higher and higher income levels, and to adults. This is about poor children,” he said. “But we can work it out.”

It took Bush six years to veto his first bill, when he blocked expanded federal research using embryonic stem cells last summer. In May, he vetoed a spending bill that would have required troop withdrawals from Iraq. In June, he vetoed another bill to ease restraints on federally funded stem cell research.

In the case of the health insurance program, the veto is a bit of a high-stakes gambit for Bush, pitting him against both the Democrats who have controlled both houses of Congress since January, but also many members of his own party and the public.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee launched radio ads Monday attacking eight GOP House members who voted against the bill and face potentially tough re-election campaigns next year.

And Gerald McEntee, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees union, said a coalition of liberal groups was staging more than 200 events throughout the nation on Thursday to highlight the issue. The group, which includes MoveOn.org, and several unions, also has a goal of more than 1 million contacts to Congress through calls, letters and e-mails demanding that lawmakers override Bush’s veto. The coalition is spending $3 million to $5 million on the effort.

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Bill Maher attacked 9/11 truthers.

October 2, 2007

9/11 Truthers Respond to Bill Maher

Wake up Bill Maher!

We Respond

http://www.wakethefuckup.us
http://www.wc911truth.com
http://www.wearechangela.org
http://www.truthaction.org
www.wearechange.org

I lost all respect for Maher when he religiously defended Israel, wake up democrats, your party is just as controlled by Zionists as the Republicans.

-KYLE

Myanmar libero!BURMA FREE

September 29, 2007

http://www.flickr.com/groups/531398@N23/

Police Clash with Protesters in Myanmar (Monks Protest)

September 28, 2007

Police Clash with Protesters in Myanmar (Monks Protest)

26.09.2007 Yangon, Myanmar (Burma) – The military dictatorship in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, cracked down on escalating anti-government street protests on Wednesday, Sept. 26, with troops firing over the heads of large crowds in Yangon, the country’s main city. Riot police fired tear gas at columns of monks trying to push their way past barricades sealing off the Shwedagon Pagoda, Myanmar’s holiest shrine and the starting point of marches that mushroomed from small protests against huge fuel price increases. Angry crowds filled the streets of Yangon, defying the military violence meant to curb the biggest anti-government protests in 20 years.

Jim Carrey – Call to Action on Burma and Aung San Suu Kyi

September 28, 2007

Jim Carrey – Call to Action on Burma and Aung San Suu Kyi

Jim Carrey calls for people to support the world’s only imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi. He also decries Burma’s military regime for recruiting more child soldiers than any other country in the world, destroying 3,000 villages in eastern Burma, and forcing 1.5 million refugees to flee. He appeals to viewers to join two organizations:The Human Rights Action Center
http://www.humanrightsactioncenter.org
U.S. Campaign for Burma
http://www.uscampaignforburma.org

President Bush Addresses The United Nations General Assembly

September 28, 2007

9:57 A.M. EDT

PRESIDENT BUSH: Mr. Secretary General, Mr. President, distinguished delegates, ladies and gentlemen: Thank you for the opportunity to address the General Assembly of the United Nations.

Sixty years ago, representatives from 16 nations gathered to begin deliberations on a new international bill of rights. The document they produced is called the Universal Declaration of Human Rights — and it stands as a landmark achievement in the history of human liberty. It opens by recognizing “the inherent dignity” and the “equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family” as “the foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in the world.” And as we gather for this 62nd General Assembly, the standards of the Declaration must guide our work in this world.

Achieving the promise of the Declaration requires confronting long-term threats; it also requires answering the immediate needs of today. The nations in this chamber have our differences, yet there are some areas where we can all agree. When innocent people are trapped in a life of murder and fear, the Declaration is not being upheld. When millions of children starve to death or perish from a mosquito bite, we’re not doing our duty in the world. When whole societies are cut off from the prosperity of the global economy, we’re all worse off. Changing these underlying conditions is what the Declaration calls the work of “larger freedom” — and it must be the work of every nation in this assembly.

This great institution must work for great purposes — to free people from tyranny and violence, hunger and disease, illiteracy and ignorance, and poverty and despair. Every member of the United Nations must join in this mission of liberation.

First, the mission of the United Nations requires liberating people from tyranny and violence. The first article of the Universal Declaration begins, “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” The truth is denied by terrorists and extremists who kill the innocent with the aim of imposing their hateful vision on humanity. The followers of this violent ideology are a threat to civilized people everywhere. All civilized nations must work together to stop them — by sharing intelligence about their networks, and choking their — off their finances, and bringing to justice their operatives.

In the long run, the best way to defeat extremists is to defeat their dark ideology with a more hopeful vision — the vision of liberty that founded this body. The United States salutes the nations that have recently taken strides toward liberty — including Ukraine and Georgia and Kyrgyzstan and Mauritania and Liberia, Sierra Leone and Morocco. The Palestinian Territories have moderate leaders, mainstream leaders that are working to build free institutions that fight terror, and enforce the law, and respond to the needs of their people. The international community must support these leaders, so that we can advance the vision of two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, living side-by-side in peace and security.

Brave citizens in Lebanon and Afghanistan and Iraq have made the choice for democracy — yet the extremists have responded by targeting them for murder. This is not a show of strength — it is evidence of fear. And the extremists are doing everything in their power to bring down these young democracies. The people of Lebanon and Afghanistan and Iraq have asked for our help. And every civilized nation has a responsibility to stand with them.

Every civilized nation also has a responsibility to stand up for the people suffering under dictatorship. In Belarus, North Korea, Syria, and Iran, brutal regimes deny their people the fundamental rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration. Americans are outraged by the situation in Burma, where a military junta has imposed a 19-year reign of fear. Basic freedoms of speech, assembly, and worship are severely restricted. Ethnic minorities are persecuted. Forced child labor, human trafficking, and rape are common. The regime is holding more than 1,000 political prisoners — including Aung San Suu Kyi, whose party was elected overwhelmingly by the Burmese people in 1990.

The ruling junta remains unyielding, yet the people’s desire for freedom is unmistakable. This morning, I’m announcing a series of steps to help bring peaceful change to Burma. The United States will tighten economic sanctions on the leaders of the regime and their financial backers. We will impose an expanded visa ban on those responsible for the most egregious violations of human rights, as well as their family members. We’ll continue to support the efforts of humanitarian groups working to alleviate suffering in Burma. And I urge the United Nations and all nations to use their diplomatic and economic leverage to help the Burmese people reclaim their freedom.

In Cuba, the long rule of a cruel dictator is nearing its end. The Cuban people are ready for their freedom. And as that nation enters a period of transition, the United Nations must insist on free speech, free assembly, and ultimately, free and competitive elections.

In Zimbabwe, ordinary citizens suffer under a tyrannical regime. The government has cracked down on peaceful calls for reform, and forced millions to flee their homeland. The behavior of the Mugabe regime is an assault on its people — and an affront to the principles of the Universal Declaration. The United Nations must insist on change in Harare — and must insist for the freedom of the people of Zimbabwe.

In Sudan, innocent civilians are suffering repression — and in the Darfur region, many are losing their lives to genocide. America has responded with tough sanctions against those responsible for the violence. We’ve provided more than $2 billion in humanitarian and peacekeeping aid. I look forward to attending a Security Council meeting that will focus on Darfur, chaired by the French President. I appreciate France’s leadership in helping to stabilize Sudan’s neighbors. And the United Nations must answer this challenge to conscience, and live up to its promise to promptly deploy peacekeeping forces to Darfur.

Second, the mission of the United Nations requires liberating people from hunger and disease. Article 25 of the Universal Declaration states: “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food and clothing and housing and medical care.” Around the world, the United Nations is carrying out noble efforts to live up to these words.

Feeding the hungry has long been a special calling for my nation. Today, more than half the world’s food assistance comes from America. We send emergency food stocks to starving people from camps in Sudan to slums in — around the world. I’ve proposed an innovative initiative to alleviate hunger under which America would purchase the crops of local farmers in Africa and elsewhere, rather than shipping in food from the developed world. This would help build up local agriculture and break the cycle of famine in the developing world — and I urge our United States Congress to support this initiative.

Many in this hall are bringing the spirit of generosity to fighting HIV/AIDS and malaria. Five years ago, in Sub-Saharan Africa, an AIDS diagnosis was widely considered a death sentence, and fewer than 50,000 people infected with the virus were receiving treatment. The world responded by creating the Global Fund, which is working with governments and the private sector to fight the disease around the world. The United States decided to take these steps a little further by launching the $15 billion Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Since 2003, this effort has helped bring cutting-edge medicines to more than a million people in sub-Sahara Africa. It’s a good start. So earlier this year, I proposed to double our initial commitment to $30 billion. By coming together, the world can turn the tide against HIV/AIDS — once and for all.

Malaria is another common killer. In some countries, malaria takes as many lives as HIV/AIDS — the vast majority of them children under the age of five years old. Every one of these deaths is unnecessary, because the disease is preventable and treatable. The world knows what it takes to stop malaria — bed nets and indoor spraying and medicine to treat the disease. Two years ago, America launched a $1.2 billion malaria initiative. Other nations and the private sector are making vital contributions, as well. I call on every member state to maintain its focus, find new ways to join this cause, and bring us closer to the day when malaria deaths are no more.

Third, the mission of the United Nations requires liberating people from the chains of illiteracy and ignorance. Article 26 of the Universal Declaration states: “Everyone has the right to education.” And when nations make the investments needed to educate their people, the whole world benefits. Better education unleashes the talent and potential of its citizens, and adds to the prosperity of all of us. Better education promotes better health and greater independence. Better education increases the strength of democracy, and weakens the appeal of violent ideologies. So the United States is joining with nations around the world to help them provide a better education for their people.

A good education starts with good teachers. In partnership with other nations, America has helped train more than 600,000 teachers and administrators. A good education requires good textbooks. So in partnership with other nations, America has distributed tens of millions of textbooks. A good education requires access to good schools. So in partnership with other nations, America is helping nations raise standards in their schools at home, and providing scholarships to help students come to schools in the United States. In all our education efforts, our nation is working to expand access for women and girls, so that the opportunity to get a decent education is open to all.

Finally, the mission of the United Nations requires liberating people from poverty and despair. Article 23 of the Universal Declaration states: “Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, [and] to just and favorable conditions of work.” In the 21st century, this requires ensuring that people in poor countries have the same opportunity to benefit from the global economy that citizens of wealthy countries have.

The United Nations provides vital economic assistance designed to help developing nations grow their economies and reach their potential. The United States agrees with that position; we’ve dramatically increased our own development assistance — and we’re delivering that aid in innovative ways. We started the Millennium Challenge Account to reward nations that govern justly, fight corruption, invest in their people, and promote economic freedom. With this aid, we’re reaching out to developing nations in partnership, not paternalism. And we’re ensuring that our aid dollars reach those who need them — and achieve results.

In the long run, the best way to lift people out of poverty is through trade and investment. A nation that is open and trading with the world will create economic rewards that far exceed anything they could get through foreign aid. During the 1990s, developing nations that significantly lowered tariffs saw their per capita income grow about three times faster than other developing countries. Open markets ignite growth, encourage investment, increase transparency, strengthen the rule of law, and help countries help themselves.

The international community now has an historic chance to open markets around the world by concluding a successful Doha Round of trade talks. A successful Doha outcome would mean real and substantial openings in agriculture, goods, and services — and real and substantial reductions in trade-distorting subsidies. The world’s largest trading nations, including major developing countries, have a special responsibility to make the tough political decisions to reduce trade barriers. America has the will and flexibility to make those necessary decisions. Our negotiators are demonstrating that spirit in Geneva. I urge other leaders to direct their negotiators to do the same. And I’m optimistic that we can reach a good Doha agreement — and seize this once-in-a-generation opportunity.

In the meantime, America will continue to pursue agreements that open trade and investment wherever we can. We recently signed free trade agreements with Peru, Colombia, Panama, and South Korea. These agreements embody the values of open markets — transparent and fair regulation, respect for private property, and resolving disputes under international law rules. These are good agreements, and they’re now ready for a congressional vote, and I urge the Congress to approve them as soon as possible.

As America works with the United Nations to alleviate immediate needs, we’re also coming together to address longer-term challenges. Together, we’re preparing for pandemics that could cause death and suffering on a global scale. Together, we’re working to stop the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Together, we’re confronting the challenges of energy security, and environmental quality, and climate change. I appreciate the discussions on climate change led by the Secretary General last night. I look forward to further discussions at the meeting of major economies in Washington later this week.

The goals I’ve outlined today cannot be achieved overnight — and they cannot be achieved without reform in this vital institution. The United States is committed to a strong and vibrant United Nations. Yet the American people are disappointed by the failures of the Human Rights Council. This body has been silent on repression by regimes from Havana to Caracas to Pyongyang and Tehran — while focusing its criticism excessively on Israel. To be credible on human rights in the world, the United Nations must reform its own Human Rights Council.

Some have also called for reform to the structure of the Security Council, including an expansion of its membership. The United States is open to this prospect. We believe that Japan is well-qualified for permanent membership on the Security Council, and that other nations should be considered, as well. The United States will listen to all good ideas, and we will support changes to the Security Council as part of broader U.N. reform. And in all we do, I call on member states to work for an institution that adheres to strict ethical standards, and lives up to the high principles of the Universal Declaration.

With the commitment and courage of this chamber, we can build a world where people are free to speak, assemble, and worship as they wish; a world where children in every nation grow up healthy, get a decent education, and look to the future with hope; a world where opportunity crosses every border. America will lead toward this vision where all are created equal, and free to pursue their dreams. This is the founding conviction of my country. It is the promise that established this body. And with our determination, it can be the future of our world.

Thank you, and God bless. (Applause.)

END 10:18 A.M. EDT

Statement By H.E. Mr. Felipe Pérez Roque, Minister Of Foreign Affairs Of The Republic Of Cuba, At The 62nd Session Of The United Nations General Assembly « Unminds Must Fear

September 28, 2007

Statement By H.E. Mr. Felipe Pérez Roque, Minister Of Foreign Affairs Of The Republic Of Cuba, At The 62nd Session Of The United Nations General Assembly « Unminds Must Fear

Statement By H.E. Mr. Felipe Pérez Roque, Minister Of Foreign Affairs Of The Republic Of Cuba, At The 62nd Session Of The United Nations General Assembly

September 28th, 2007 · No Comments

With a foul language and an arrogant tone, President Bush insulted and threatened some ten countries; he gave orders, in a firm and authoritarian fashion, to the General Assembly; and with such bossiness never ever seen in this hall, he dished out terms and judgments on a score of countries.

It was an embarrassing show. The delirium tremens of the world’s policeman. The intoxication of imperial power, sprinkled with the mediocrity and the cynicism of those who threaten to launch wars in which they know their life is not at stake.

The President of the United States has no right at all to pass judgment on any other sovereign nation on this planet. Having powerful nuclear weapons offers no right whatsoever to tread upon the rights of the peoples of the other 191 countries that are represented here.

And the determination and courage of the peoples should not be underestimated when it comes to defending their rights! After all, what prevails is not the power of cannons but the fairness of the ideas that you fight for. The bullish and menacing President should have already learned it by now.

Sovereign equality of States and not “regime change.” Respect for sovereignty and not unilateral certifications of good behavior. Respect for International Law and not illegal blockades and wars.

President Bush talked about democracy, but we all know that he is lying. He came into office through fraud and deceit. We would have been spared his presence yesterday and would have listened to President Albert Gore talking about climate change and the risks to our species. We also recall how he brazenly supported the coup d’etat against the President and the Constitution of Venezuela.

He talked about peace, but we know that he is lying. We remember very well when he threatened 60 or more countries, which he called “dark corners of the world,” saying that he would wipe them off the face of the earth with pre-emptive and surprise attacks. Bush is a strange warrior who, from the rearguard, sends the young people of his country to kill and to die thousands of kilometers away.

He talked about human rights, but we know that he is lying. He is responsible for the death of 600,000 civilians in Iraq; he authorized tortures at the Guantánamo Naval Base and at Abu Ghraib, and he is an accessory to the kidnapping and disappearance of people, as well as to the secret flights and the clandestine prisons.

He talked about the fight against terrorism, but we know that he is lying. He has ensured complete impunity for the most hateful terrorist groups which, from Miami, have perpetrated heinous crimes against the Cuban people.

President Bush attacked the new Human Rights Council. He is bleeding through the wound; he is grunting his helplessness. He is haunted by the shamefulness that, during his term in office, the United States cannot even look forward to being a member because elections are through secret ballot. Cuba, in turn, was elected as a founding member of the Council with more than two-thirds of the votes.

He talked about cooperation, development and prosperity for the rest of the world, but we all know that he is lying. He has been the most selfish and reckless politician we have ever seen. In a world that this year will bear witness to the death of 10 million children under the age of 5 through preventable diseases, his self-seeking and empty proposals of yesterday are but a sick joke.

President Bush has no moral authority or credibility to judge anyone. He should be held accountable to the world for his crimes.

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Alex Jones’ ENDGAME – Trailer

September 27, 2007

Alex Jones’ ENDGAME – Trailer